Keisha Sean Waites is in the runoff for City Council Post 3 At Large.

Candidate website: www.keishawaites.com

What makes your policy on public safety different and better than your opponent’s? 

In Feb 2012, I was elected to the Georgia General Assembly as State Rep. for District 60, where I served 3-terms. I had the privilege of serving on the Public Safety responsible for vetting legislation and policy before a floor vote.  Our city is at a crossroad.  In the Georgia General Assembly, I was a fierce advocate for women and families, and I focused on public safety.  Having existing relationships and legislative experience will be critical to tackling many of the issues we are facing such as: Increasing violent crime. I’m running for a citywide post because as a native Atlanta, I am outraged with the spiking crime and violence permeating our city.  I feel I can help the most people by influencing the policies and legislation governing how the city operates, and making sure services are delivered. I have the experience, legislative knowledge, and relationships at local, state and federal levels necessary to get the job done.  

Why are you the better choice to improve infrastructure and city services? 

I served in government for 19 years working at the local, state, regional and federal levels. I have existing relationships and intimately understand how to move important policy issues though all levels of government. I believe that my diverse qualifications and experience, which includes decades of community involvement throughout the city, my service in the state legislature, and my proven background in crisis management and problem solving combine uniquely qualify me to serve.  I am the only candidate in the race that has successfully served 3-terms in a legislative capacity.   We are elected to deliver results.  If trust is faltering, that means residents aren’t receiving the services they expect.  Public trust and integrity are essential for our city to thrive, attract new industry, new commerce and new residents.   

One of the most important tasks for the Mayor of Atlanta and City Council is to assure residents that their tax dollars are being spent wisely, with a focus on providing quality services.

Why are you the better candidate on transportation policy? 

During my tenure in the legislature, I served on the transportation committee sponsoring the authorizing legislation to bring high speed rail to Georgia. That legislation effectively advocates for regional transit expansion. As we explore solutions to regional transit problems, I will be utilizing existing relationships to solicit regional financial assistance from the federal DOT, State of Georgia, Fulton County, and other service recipients. I support investing in putting transit on the Atlanta Beltline, expanding MARTA’s rail network, and ensuring our city is safe for pedestrians and cyclists. I also support relaunching the City bike share program to provide affordable first- and last-mile access to transit, especially in communities with low rates of car ownership. Additionally, we must provide pedestrian and bicycle friendly amenities that make people want to walk and ride within city limits.

Why are you the better candidate for this office, period? 

I have dedicated my entire professional career to helping people and trying to improve our city. I have spent 2-decades working agencies such as: FEMA and SBA helping individuals and families recover from events outside of their control. I’m running for a citywide post on the Atlanta City Council because I’m tired of, poor quality services being provided, money being wasted, and flat out corruption. There’s a real opportunity to position our city to equitably manage and capitalize on the growth that’s coming.  COVID changed the way people live, work and play.  I feel I can help the most people by influencing the policies and legislation governing how the city operates, and making sure services are delivered. I have the experience, legislative knowledge, and connections at local, state and federal levels necessary to get the job done. This is not the time for on the “On the Job Training.”


Read Keisha Sean Waites’ Q&A from the general election.

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